SUDAN’S LONG TIME DICTATOR OVERTHROWN?

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Gathering crowds await Sudan army statement

Summary

  1. State radio broadcasts interrupted by marching music
  2. Crowds surge towards defence ministry
  3. Speculation that military could force president to quit
  4. President Bashir has ruled since 1989

Reports of high-level talks at army HQ

A respected Sudanese journalist says she understands that a meeting of Sudan’s top military and security brass is taking place right now to discuss who will lead a new transitional High Council of Armed forces.

Here are her tweets:

Yousra Elbagir@YousraElbagir · 1hReplying to @YousraElbagir

Things are far from over if this is the case. Gosh and Hemidti’s forces have been the main perpetrators of lethal violence against protesters since the revolution began in late December.

Yousra Elbagir@YousraElbagir

LATEST from a 2nd insider: there is currently a meeting underway at the Military Command HQ between spy chief Gosh, RSF/Janjaweed leader Hemidti, Defence minister & current VP Awad Ibn Auf & head of the police, discussing who will lead transitional High Council of Armed Forces.977:27 AM – Apr 11, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacy103 people are talking about thisReportReport this social embed, make a complaint

Yousra Elbagir@YousraElbagir · 1hReplying to @YousraElbagir

LATEST from a 2nd insider: there is currently a meeting underway at the Military Command HQ between spy chief Gosh, RSF/Janjaweed leader Hemidti, Defence minister & current VP Awad Ibn Auf & head of the police, discussing who will lead transitional High Council of Armed Forces.

Yousra Elbagir@YousraElbagir

This political insider says that Sudanese Army’s Chief of General Staff Lieutenant General Kamal Abdel-Marouf is their top choice to head the transitional council.757:28 AM – Apr 11, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacy

‘Mounting anticipation’ that Bashir’s rule is ending

An announcement by the army in Sudan is now expected, raising anticipation that President Omar al-Bashir’s 30 years in power are coming to an end.

Tens of thousands of people have been maintaining a protest vigil outside military headquarters since Saturday, demanding the removal of the president.

On two successive nights they were attacked by intelligence and militia forces loyal to him – and on both occasions the army stepped in to protect them.

This was an early sign of fracturing in a previously steadfast security establishment.

How pressure has built on Bashir’s regime

Protests against Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir, who has governed Sudan since 1989, have been under way since December.

They were originally sparked by a rise in the cost of living, but demonstrators are now calling for the president to resign and his government to go.

Representatives of the protesters say they are seeking talks with the army regarding the formation of a transitional government.

Omar el-Digeir, a senior protest member, told AFP news agency last week that the group was seeking a path “that represents the wish of the revolution”.

Police have ordered officers not to intervene against the protests.

On Tuesday, a police spokesman called for “an agreement which would support the peaceful transition of power” in Sudan.

The government has been criticised by rights groups for a heavy-handed response to the unrest.

Government officials admit 38 people have died since the unrest began in December, but the pressure group Human Rights Watch says the number is higher.

In February, it looked as though the president might step down, but instead Mr Bashir declared a state of national emergency.

Now, his fate is unclear, with state media reporting that the army is to make an “important” announcement soon.

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